Astronomy Events – September 2013

on

by yaska77

September is usually a good month for us for observing.  It’s not so cold your fingers freeze, but it is dark enough earlier in the evening now to get some good stargazing in before finally falling in to bed.

And there are also fewer neighbours sat outside with garden lights on messing up our viewing!

There is always something worth observing in the night sky, but as usual we’ve cherry picked some of the best upcoming points of astronomical interest over the next month. So keep watching the skies!

Sunday 1st September – Early morning the crescent Moon appears close by planets Mars and Jupiter, look east if you’re up early enough (or late enough!)

Look east around 03:00 UTC/ 04:00 BST to spot the Moon with Mars and Jupiter in the eastern sky (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium
Look east around 03:00 UTC/ 04:00 BST to spot the Moon with Mars and Jupiter in the eastern sky (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Thursday 5th September – This evening sees a new Moon which rises and sets with the Sun, making now a good time to observe deep sky objects like star clusters, galaxies and nebulae

Sunday 8th September – If you’ve got good binoculars or a telescope you can have a look at something we imaged ourselves in 2011. Mars can be found accompanied by M44, or the Beehive Cluster (also called Praesepe) low down near the eastern horizon early this morning

Rising soon after 01:30 UTC / 02:30 BST, look to the east to spot Mars in the Beehive, which is shown about at 03:30 UTC / 04:30 BST (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium
Rising soon after 01:30 UTC / 02:30 BST, look to the east to spot Mars in the Beehive, which is shown about at 03:30 UTC / 04:30 BST (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Messier 44 is an open cluster in the constellation Cancer, and one of the closest clusters to our Solar System. It was also among the first objects that Galileo studied with his telescope!

We imaged Mars passing through M44 in October 2011, at the end of a very busy evening

This image was captured using a Sky-Watcher Explorer 200P Newtonian Reflector Telescope and a Canon Eos 550D (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn
This image was captured using a Sky-Watcher Explorer 200P Newtonian Reflector Telescope and a Canon EOS 550D (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

How it appears above is almost exactly as you’ll see it this time around too!

Thursday 12th September – This morning the Moon is seen at First Quarter phase

Sunday 15th September – The Moon is at Perigee today at a distance of 367,385 km (228,282 miles), the closest point of its orbit to the Earth

Thursday 19th September – The Full Moon appearing in the sky today is also sometimes known as the Barley Moon, Nut Moon or Harvest Moon

Shot with a Canon EOS 550D mounted on a Sky-Watcher Explorer 200P Newtonian Reflector Telescope (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn
Shot with a Canon EOS 550D mounted on a Sky-Watcher Explorer 200P Newtonian Reflector Telescope (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

Sunday 22nd September – Today it is Autumnal Equinox in the Northern Hemisphere

Friday 27th September – The Moon appears at Last Quarter phase this evening, and is also at Apogee at a distance of 404,880 km (251,581 miles), the farthest point out in its orbit around the Earth

Saturday 28th September – If you’d like a look at the farthest night sky object you can still see with the naked eye, the Andromeda Galaxy is high overhead around midnight at the moment

The easiest way to find M31 is to locate the "W" of Cassiopeia and follow the second bottom point of the "W" down (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium
The easiest way to find M31 is to locate the “W” of Cassiopeia and follow the second bottom point of the “W” down (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Best viewed under dark skies with the Moon absent, a good pair of binoculars should give you a nice look at a galaxy which is a close mirror image to our own Milky Way

Andromeda was the first galaxy we imaged, and this shot was created by stacking 50 single shots to bring out the clarity (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn
Andromeda was the first galaxy we imaged, and this shot was created by stacking 50 single shots to bring out the clarity (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

It will be overhead late evening/early morning for a while, so if you get chance to have a closer look at it make sure you do!

It’s well worth it 🙂

Planets visible this month:

Jupiter
Venus
Neptune
Uranus
Mars

Remember, it can take your eyes up to 20 minutes to become properly dark adapted, and anything up to an hour for a telescope to reach ambient temperature outside (to ensure the best image), so give yourself plenty of time to get set up!

To make it easier to find this list of astronomical happenings you can also locate it in the “Monthly Guide” section in the menu bar to the right. Handy! 🙂

Guide images created with Stellarium

Archive:
Astronomy Events – August 2013
Astronomy Events – July 2013
Astronomy Events – June 2013

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s